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On the tenth anniversary of the CW’s flagship series, Blake Lively had quit acting.The blonde Tarzana, California, native—who, one imagines, leaves a trail of sunflower emojis and the scent of cupcake icing in her wake wherever she goes—had had enough.But ’s creators and show-runners, Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage, already had the beaches of Newport in their rearview mirror, with their sights on a next project.They had been sent Cecily von Ziegesar’s popular ] and its kind of crazy four-year run that we wanted to take and apply to something moving forward, and we were really excited about doing something in New York,” Schwartz said over lunch in Los Angeles this past winter.magazine featured the (scantily clad) cast of the show on its cover toward the end of the first season, proclaiming in its cover headline (only semi-tongue in cheek), “BEST. EVER.”At its core, though, while the fashion and music and Lively-ness of it all no doubt drew a large swath of viewers, the central, relatable dilemmas faced by the main characters—Blair and Serena, as well as Brooklyn “lonely boy” and eventual Serena boyfriend Dan Humphrey, ostentatious bad boy and Blair soul-mate Chuck Bass, and pinup prepster Nate Archibald—were what kept people tuning in.“Phones get updated, but the inner life of teenagers, and the things that they struggle with, are pretty timeless, regardless of what device they’re on,” Schwartz said.The trailer for Netflix’s show “Mindhunter” is here, and it’s just as creepy as a show about serial killers should be.The trailer begins with one killer saying, “It’s not easy butchering people. I don’t think people realize you need to vent.” The David Fincher-produced series, set in 1979, follows two FBI agents, played by Jonathan Groff and Holt Mc Callany, as they listen to venting killers, searching for a way to understand the motivation behind their brutal and senseless violence in order to prevent future murders.

The notion of a group of people being callously gossiped about online by an anonymous troll certainly has resonance in our current climate, in which celebrities (as well as politicians and public figures) are often blogged about with a blithe and biting disregard.I remember where I was [when watching it] and what I was doing in my life.’”Viewers wanted to dress like the characters; they wanted their haircuts and jewelry and ringtones; they wanted to talk like them and listen to the music they listened to.At some New York City private schools, the show—which featured its lead characters partaking in all sorts of illicit antics—was in fact “banned,” which of course only served, in all likelihood, to make the students want to watch it more.“We knew we needed the show,” Ostroff (currently president of Condé Nast Entertainment) said. You have to really hit something that’s in the zeitgeist, or really going to matter to people in a way that becomes an emotional connection.And it was even more difficult for us, because we were going after a younger, more finicky audience.”It was a perfect storm: a buzzy property, a hot creative team, and a new network.