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The student is expected to: (A) classify different aquatic organisms using tools such as dichotomous keys; (B) compare and describe how adaptations allow an organism to exist within an aquatic environment; and (C) compare differences in adaptations of aquatic organisms to fresh water and marine environments. The student knows about the interdependence and interactions that occur in aquatic environments.

The student is expected to: (A) identify how energy flows and matter cycles through both fresh water and salt water aquatic systems, including food webs, chains, and pyramids; and (B) evaluate the factors affecting aquatic population cycles. The student understands how human activities impact aquatic environments.

Suggested prerequisite: Chemistry or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry. In Aquatic Science, students study the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in aquatic environments, including impacts on aquatic systems.

This course is recommended for students in Grades 10, 11, or 12. Investigations and field work in this course may emphasize fresh water or marine aspects of aquatic science depending primarily upon the natural resources available for study near the school.

The student is expected to: (A) differentiate among freshwater, brackish, and saltwater ecosystems; (B) identify the major properties and components of different marine and freshwater life zones; and (C) identify biological, chemical, geological, and physical components of an aquatic life zone as they relate to the organisms in it. The student knows environmental adaptations of aquatic organisms.The student is expected to: (A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student; (B) communicate and apply scientific information extracted from various sources such as current events, news reports, published journal articles, and marketing materials; (C) draw inferences based on data related to promotional materials for products and services; (D) evaluate the impact of research and technology on scientific thought, society, and the environment; (E) describe the connection between aquatic science and future careers; and (F) research and describe the history of aquatic science and contributions of scientists. Students know that aquatic environments are the product of Earth systems interactions.The student is expected to: (A) identify key features and characteristics of atmospheric, geological, hydrological, and biological systems as they relate to aquatic environments; (B) apply systems thinking to the examination of aquatic environments, including positive and negative feedback cycles; and (C) collect and evaluate global environmental data using technology such as maps, visualizations, satellite data, Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information System (GIS), weather balloons, buoys, etc. The student conducts long-term studies on local aquatic environments. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science, High School, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011.The provisions of 112.32-112.39 of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2010-2011 school year.