Optical dating of sediments

Written by one of the foremost experts on optical dating, this book aims to bring together in a coherent whole the various strands of research that are ongoing in the area.It gives beginners an introduction to the technique as well as acting as a valuable source of up to date references.The text is divided into three parts; main text, technical notes and appendices.

optical dating of sediments-44optical dating of sediments-32optical dating of sediments-86

Feldspar IRSL techniques have the potential to extend the datable range out to a million years as feldspars typically have significantly higher dose saturation levels than quartz, though issues regarding anomalous fading will need to be dealt with first.

Stimulating these mineral grains using either light (blue or green for OSL; infrared for IRSL) or heat (for TL) causes a luminescence signal to be emitted as the stored unstable electron energy is released, the intensity of which varies depending on the amount of radiation absorbed during burial and specific properties of the mineral.

Most luminescence dating methods rely on the assumption that the mineral grains were sufficiently "bleached" at the time of the event being dated.

The minerals that are measured are usually either quartz or potassium feldspar sand-sized grains, or unseparated silt-sized grains.

There are advantages and disadvantages to using each.