Marital dating online

Meetings matter To find out whether meeting place influences the marriage in the long term, Cacioppo and his colleagues analyzed divorces, separations and marital satisfaction among their participants.They found that divorce and separation were slightly higher in those who met offline, with 7.6 percent of that group split up compared with 5.9 percent of those who met online."Moreover, analyses of breakups indicated that marriages that began in an online meeting were less likely to end in separation or divorce than marriages that began in an offline venue." [6 Scientific Tips for a Successful Marriage] The study was funded by the dating site e Harmony.Independent statisticians oversaw the data, and e Harmony agreed that the results could be published regardless of how the data reflected on the website.A final possibility is that people open up more online than they do in face-to-face meetings.Experimental lab studies have found that people are more willing to engage in "self-disclosure," or authentic discussions about themselves, when they meet online first.

Other less-frequent meeting places included bars, churches or temples, blind dates and growing up together.There were differences between people who met online and those who met offline — men, 30- to 49-year-olds, Hispanics, the employed and the economically better-off were all more likely to turn to the Internet for dates.Nevertheless, the differences in marital success and satisfaction held up even after the researchers controlled for year of marriage, gender, age, education, income, ethnicity, employment and religion.Another 21 percent met on social networks, while the rest got to know each other from a mixture of blogs, gaming sites, chat rooms, discussion groups and other online communities.Of the people who met offline, work was the most popular place to find a spouse, with 21 percent of couples reporting office romance.