Internet dating website scams

Then, when you are finally all in, they spring their trap.

They ask for money, like "Adam Smith" did with Lilo Schuster. "You feel like you're contributing to your relationship, that you're helping his daughter be able to go on a trip that he couldn't provide for her, but, you know, he'll pay me back is what he had said," she recalled. If someone you are dating — online or otherwise — asks you for money, do not give it.

If you think you have already been scammed, file a report with the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center.

As the number of people looking to meet new people online grows, so does the opportunity for fraud.

It can happen like this: “Maria” signed up for an online dating service and was contacted by “Andrew,” who claimed to be an American overseas on business in Australia.

Maria and Andrew seemed to hit it off and began planning a road trip for that summer when Andrew would come back to the U. Andrew sent Maria a check for ,000 to cover the cost of their trip, but then suddenly asked her to send ,500 back to him because he needed money for rent after being laid off from his job.

"I was pretty upset because I felt so excited that I thought that I had met somebody," she said.

"He has a child and he's in Afghanistan and he's fighting the terrorists and he's a pilot, and I thought my prayers had been answered," Schuster said. Eventually, Smith asked Schuster to wire him some money to help support his daughter. She had sent him nearly ,000 before she finally realized the whole thing was a scam.